A summary of the DOGA Conference 2020

Einar Sneve Martinussen, Professor at AHO, and design student Hanna Øfsti talked about the collaboration between KMD, DOGA and AHO.

Photo: DOGA

We are moving towards a more fragmented world, where solutions that satisfy a whole community seem impossible to find. The big and complex word “community” was this year’s topic at the DOGA conference. And the million-dollar question was: “How can design and architecture help maintain the high level of confidence in Norwegian society?”
 
Here we would like to share some of the thoughts from speakers of the conference and the topics they discussed: Trust, dialogue and action. 


MONICA MÆLAND, Minister of Justice and Public Security
CHANGE CAN BE PAINFUL BUT NECESSARY.

Former Minister of Local Government and Modernization, Monica Mæland, opened this year’s conference talking about subjects including KMD’s work related to its parliamentary report on innovation. Through her earlier position as Minister of Trade and Industry Monica has in-depth insight regarding restructuring, innovation and technology in relation to the business world. Despite this, the question on why we work with innovation is still often raised. We have a very large public sector in Norway. It concerns us all and we must continuously think about restructuring, change and renewal to face the challenges of tomorrow.
 
As part of the parliamentary report, KMD has worked on a strategic forward vision process in collaboration with leaders and employees of the public sector. It’s about looking towards 2040 to see how society and the public system are going to be and experienced by our inhabitants. The big questions asked are:
 

  • How will we manage to maintain trust in our society?
  • What change, and to what extent will we change?
  • What do you want to share with the community?
  • What do you want to create together? What can I manage to take responsibility for outside my own apartment?


TRUST
IDA AALEN, Confrere TRUST AND USER INVOLVEMENT

Ida Aalen from Confrere also touched on the subject of trust. The way to new solutions often means change. But if you move too quickly the trust might slide away even though the solution might be right. Aalen claims that the importance of user involvement is essential to create trust, and that trust is the key to creating successful solutions in a landscape where it’s considered healthy to question digital services. We need to involve our collaboratives in the process to a much greater extent. 


DIALOGUE
EINAR SNEVE MARTINUSSEN & HANNA ØFSTI, The Oslo School of Architecture and Design (AHO)
DESIGNED RESEARCH AS A TOOL.


Einar Sneve Martinussen, Professor at AHO, and design student Hanna Øfsti talked about the collaboration between KMD, DOGA and AHO. This project resulted in a Future laboratory based on KMD’s report. 19 master’s students in service and interaction design at AHO used design as a means to present four different scenarios with various rates of change and confidence development related to the public sector for Norway in 2040. By building physical rooms, digital and tactile prototypes and touchpoints, the lab’s visitors had the opportunity to experience different scenarios of 2040 – today. Using design to give examples and suggest what experiences may be in store had a huge impact on the audience, and as Mæland said: «Exciting, but scary. » Her own hope for us as a society is to create a future that is not one of the four scenarios, but something in between. 


ACTION
SIV HELENE STANGELAND, the architectural firm Helen&Hard GAINING BY SHARING 

The day was wrapped up by Siv Helene Stangeland telling the audience about a very exciting stay-development project in Stavanger. Diversity, user complicity and community building were central parts of the project. As an architect and through earlier processes Stangeland had been missing closer contact with the target groups and actual users of the buildings they create. She believes that this issue contributes to some of the largest challenges in our community – segregation, loneliness, health issues and of course our big imprint of Co2. It is the users that are key to the needs of tomorrow.
 
In collaboration with investor Sissel Leire and industrial designer Kristin Støren Wigum they came up with a vision back in 2010. They called it «Gaining by Sharing» and contains plans on how to reduce our imprint through properties and at the same time experience a good quality of life. The model shows how we, through sharing land and resources get more than if you only had your own apartment, the model developed for the vision and the housing project was different from other models Stangeland had worked on before. Here the involvement process with the users was strong. A community between the residents was formed in parallel with building the home. Through a series of seminars, resident courses, workshops and prototypes the future residents were given the opportunity to influence the project according to their own needs.


In addition, there was room and time to reflect on what it means to move into a shared housing community:

  • What do you want to share with the community?
  • What do you want to create together? What can I manage to take responsibility for outside my own apartment?